Zhang Xiumei (Tsab Xyooj Mem)

During the Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12), when the government decided to replace local chiefs with officials appointed by the central government, minority groups (particularly the Miao) rebelled. Rebellions and suppressions were so common there that there was a saying, “a riot every 30 years and a major rebellion every 60 years.” In 1726 at the Battle of Mount Leigong, more than 10,000 Miao were beheaded and more than 400,000 starved to death. The Banjiang Riot of 1797 was said to have been started by the Buyi people, and thousands of them were either burned to death or beheaded. The most important popular revolt against the central government was one led by Zhang Xiumei, a Miao, in 1855. He and his followers united with the Taiping revolutionaries, and the joint army with a centralized command that was organized soon controlled eastern and southern Guizhou and won numerous victories under the Miao leaders Yan Dawu and Bao Dadu. When the Miao were eventually defeated in 1872, however, countless numbers of them were massacred. The most recent revolt, known as the Qian Dong (Eastern Guizhou) Incident, occurred between 1942 and 1943 as a result of exploitation and suppression by the warlord Wu Tingzhang. Bitter struggles between the Miao and Wu’s armies went on until 1944.

Sources

Chi-Keung Leung & Robert Lee Suettinger

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/325872/Guizhou/71370/History?anchor=ref591431

Yue Pheng Xiong – http://mojthem.com/

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